Five new papers and a review have been recently published which describe different uses of Endoflip® technology.

The first paper Clinical utility of a functional lumen imaging probe in management of dysphagia following head and neck cancer therapies by Wu et al shows how Endoflip®  may be used to select head and neck cancer patients who will likely benefit from dilation. In this 54 subject study (20 controls), the authors concluded that when performing an Endoflip®  measurement, failure to achieve a 114mm2 opening cross sectional area (approx. 12mm) has perfect diagnostic accuracy (100% sensitivity and 100% specificity) in detecting strictures in the pharyngoesophageal junction. This in turn may guide to the patients which will best benefit from dilation for symptomatic relief of dysphagia. Influence of Age and Eosinophilic Esophagitis on Esophageal Distensibility in a Pediatric Cohort by Menard-Katcher et al provides a fascinating insight into the evolution of the esophagus in children with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), versus normal controls. In this 132 subject study (44 controls) the authors demonstrate the effect of esophageal remodeling due to EoE in children in a range of 3-18 years of age. Figure 2 in this paper may help guide as to whether initiation of therapy may be warranted prior to the onset of disease complication. Esophageal distensibility measurement: impact on clinical management and procedure length by Ahuja et al asked the question as to whether the use of Endoflip®  impacts the clinical course of care (beyond simply producing a measurement). In this 70 patient study, the authors found that Endoflip®  measurements independently led to a change in management in 40% of cases, while Endoflip®  supported a change in the clinical course of management in a further 20% of patients. The authors also for the first time studied the learning curve for Endoflip®  measurements, and concluded that the median time per procedure was 5.75 minutes. Esophagogastric junction in systemic sclerosis: A study with the functional lumen imaging probe by Fynne et al, in a 23 patient study (11 controls) demonstrates how systemic sclerosis patients have lower resistance to distension of the gastroesophageal junction, which in turn may lead to increased risk for GERD. Finally, Application of the Functional Lumen Imaging Probe to Esophageal Disorders by Carlson et al presents a current review of Endoflip®  and its applications.

 

The references for these five papers may be found below

Clinical utility of a functional lumen imaging probe in management of dysphagia following head and neck cancer therapies.
Wu PI, Szczesniak MM, Maclean J, Choo L, Quon H, Graham PH, Zhang T, Cook IJ.
Endoscopy. 2017 May 31. doi: 10.1055/s-0043-110670. [Epub ahead of print]

Influence of Age and Eosinophilic Esophagitis on Esophageal Distensibility in a Pediatric Cohort.
Menard-Katcher C, Benitez AJ, Pan Z, Ahmed FN, Wilkins BJ, Capocelli KE, Liacouras CA, Verma R, Spergel JM, Furuta GT, Muir AB.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2017 May 16. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2017.131. [Epub ahead of print]

Esophageal distensibility measurement: impact on clinical management and procedure length
Ahuja NK, Agnihotri A, Lynch KL, Hoo-Fat D, et al
Dis Esophagus (2017) 30 (8): 1-8.

Esophagogastric junction in systemic sclerosis: A study with the functional lumen imaging probe.
Fynne L, Liao D, Aksglaede K, Lottrup C, Gregersen H, Bjerregaard NC, Drewes AM, Krogh K
Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2017 May 3. doi: 10.1111/nmo.13073. [Epub ahead of print]

Application of the Functional Lumen Imaging Probe to Esophageal Disorders.
Carlson DA, Hirano I.
Curr Treat Options Gastroenterol. 2017 Mar;15(1):10-25.

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